Criminology and Cybercrime BSc (Hons)

Overview

In the digital age, crime is becoming more complex and diverse with the internet creating new types of crime and reinventing old ones.

If you’re interested in fighting cybercrime, this combined course – the first of its kind in the UK – covers traditional criminology theory while exploring modern issues like cyber-security, online terrorism and digital forensics. You'll examine the methods and motivations of cybercriminals and learn first hand about the challenges of digital investigations.

After the course, you'll be ready to take on roles in criminal justice agencies, local government, and private and public industries.

What you'll experience:

  • Examine criminology and cybercrime at one of the largest criminology departments in the country
  • Practise modern digital investigative techniques and develop transferable skills in analysis, research and using new technologies
  • Tailor the course to meet your interests, by studying topics that match your career aspirations
  • Learn from cybercrime, criminology, probation and policing experts, and interact with practitioners from criminal justice agencies, businesses and charitable organisations

You can also:

  • Get professional counter-fraud qualifications during your studies
  • Get relevant practical experience for your future career in the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies Cybercrime Awareness Clinic
  • Meet potential employers during work placements

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies and build your CV.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

What you'll study:

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core units in this year include:

  • Criminal Justice
  • Cyberspace, Subcultures and Online Deviance
  • Essential Skills for Criminologists
  • Understanding Criminology

You'll also study one of the following units:

  • Cyber Security and Forensic Computing (requires prior knowledge of programming/technology)
  • Introduction to Digital Forensic Investigations

Year 2

Core units in this year include:

  • Cyberlaw: Governance And Human Rights
  • Questioning Criminology
  • Researching Criminology

Options to choose from in this year currently include:

  • Community Justice
  • Crime and the Media
  • Crimes of the Powerful
  • Cybercrime Clinic
  • Forensics Fundamentals *
  • Forensics Investigations *
  • Foundation of Economic Crime
  • Fundamentals of Forensic Investigation
  • Global, State and Corporate Security
  • Hate Crime
  • Key Issues in Criminal Justice
  • Law and Legal Skills
  • Learning From Experience
  • Missing Persons: Issues and Investigation
  • Modern Foreign Language
  • Online Activism, Cyberterrorism and Cyberwarfare
  • Penology and Prison
  • Police, Law and Community
  • Policing a Diverse Society
  • Principles of Economic Crime Investigation
  • The Dark Web: Threats, Freedoms and Responses
  • Victims of Crime: Key Players in Criminal Justice
  • Wildlife Crime: Threats and Response
  • Youth Crime, Youth Justice

*  only available if you have studied the L4 module above on cybersecurity and forensic computing

Optional placement year

On this course, you can do an optional work placement year between your 2nd and 3rd years to get valuable experience working in industry.

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your situation and ambitions. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Year 3

Core units in this year include:

  • Cybersecurity: Theory and Practice
  • Dissertation / Major Project

Options to choose from in this year currently include:

  • Contemporary Terrorism
  • Crime and New Technologies: Theory and Practice
  • Crime, Exclusion and Mental Health
  • Dangerous Offenders and Public Protection
  • Forensic Psychology: Investigation
  • Gender and Crime
  • Green Crime and Environmental Justice
  • Information Security Management
  • Intelligence Analysis
  • Introduction to Teaching
  • Learning From Experience
  • Management of Criminal Investigations
  • Miscarriages of Justice
  • Money Laundering and Compliance
  • Political Extremism
  • Social Policy, Justice and Crime
  • Treatment and Rehabilitation of Offenders

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • group discussions
  • practical workshops

How you'll spend your time

Each academic year is divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Most teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

You’ll be assessed through:

  • coursework
  • examinations
  • presentations
  • group projects
  • dissertation

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 18% by written exams, 7% by practical exams and 75% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 10% by practical exams and 90% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 8% by written exams, 13% by practical exams and 79% by coursework

Careers and opportunities

When you complete the course, you’ll be prepared for a career in specialised cybercrime units in police or private organisations. You could work in areas such as:

  • crime prevention
  • criminological research
  • intelligence analysis
  • digital investigations
  • security consultancy

You could also work in the prison system or do postgraduate study in criminology or cybercrime.

Our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the field. You'll also get support for up to 5 years after you leave the University.

BSc (Hons), BSc (Hons) Award
September Start
Full-time, Sandwich Study Mode
3 years Duration
L311, L311 UCAS Code

Entry Requirements For This Course

96-120 points from 3 A levels or equivalent

English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

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