International Relations with History BA (Hons)

If you're interested in the issues facing the global community and fascinated by history, this BA (Hons) International Relations with History degree course is for you.

You'll examine international issues such as the causes of conflicts, the challenges of managing migration and the global response to climate change. You'll look at current problems, past responses and government and global policies. You'll also study British and global history and develop your skills in research and analysis.

This course will set you up for a career or postgraduate study in areas such as government, the international charity sector, international organisations (such as the UN), culture and heritage, museums and international business. You'll have sought-after qualities you can transfer easily to the workplace in roles that involve analysis, research, communication and teamwork.

To do this degree, you need to apply for the BA (Hons) International Relations course. This is because it's a 'pathway' degree.

You'll study International Relations in depth and add History as a complementary subject in years 2 and 3. You'll graduate with a BA (Hons) International Relations with History degree when you finish the course.

These are the entry requirements for the BA (Hons) International Relations course.

When you finish the course, our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work and support you in identifying postgraduate study opportunities.

What can you do with an International Relations degree?

Graduates from this degree have gone on to careers in areas such as:

  • government
  • the security services
  • international organisations like the UN
  • international charities such as Amnesty International and the Red Cross
  • policy research
  • media and international business consultancy
  • political risk analysis
  • public relations
  • journalism
  • law
  • teaching
  • administration
  • the heritage sector and museums
  • publishing

What jobs can you do with an International Relations degree?

Job roles former students have gone on to include:

  • politician's researcher
  • public affairs consultant
  • social researcher
  • political analyst
  • conference organiser
  • local government administrator
  • archivist
  • museum curator
  • public relations officer
  • information analyst

You could also continue your studies at Master's or PhD level.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course. We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies.

We'll also be available to help, advise and support you for up to 5 years as you advance in your career.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience.

We'll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You'll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) International Relations with History degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Due to changing circumstances as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we may need to make changes to courses to ensure your safety and to ensure compliance with Government guidelines. We'll provide you with as much notice as possible of any such changes. Your course leader will inform you of these. Changes may include things such as modules being taught in teaching block 2 instead of teaching block 1 and teaching activities occurring in smaller group sizes.

How you're assessed

You'll be assessed through:

  • written exams
  • coursework
  • article reviews
  • essays
  • projects
  • briefing papers
  • individual and group presentations
  • 10,000 word dissertation

You'll often be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • independent study
  • work placement
  • plenaries
  • simulations
  • roundtables
  • guest lectures

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you'll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you'll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you'll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • Teaching block 1 - September to December
  • Assessment period 1 - January (and early February for some courses in 2020/21 only)
  • Teaching block 2 - January to May (February to May for some courses in 2020/21 only)
  • Assessment period 2 - May to June

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

Learning development tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • Understanding and using assignment feedback
  • Managing your time and workload
  • Revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University's library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Course costs

Tuition fees (2021 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students - £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students - £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship)
  • International students - £15,500 per year (subject to annual increase)

Tuition fees terms and conditions

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren't included in the tuition fees. So you'll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

You need to choose BA (Hons) International Relations when you apply for this course, because this is a
BA (Hons) Award
September Start
Full-time, Sandwich Study Mode
3 years Duration

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