International Relations MA

Location: Canterbury


Our International Relations MA develops your critical consideration of traditional approaches to the discipline. You gain a deeper understanding of international relations, along with a more critical understanding of the way that international affairs is best studied. The programme provides you with an ideal platform from which to enter employment, or to continue your studies.

You take two compulsory modules, ‘Philosophy and Methodology of Politics and International Relations’ and ‘International Relations Theory’, which provide a solid basis for your studies. You also choose from a comprehensive suite of modules according to your specific interests, including international security, conflict resolution, terrorism and negotiation and mediation.

The University of Kent has long been a centre of excellence for the study of the subject, which has been a core concern of the university since its establishment in 1965. Kent counts among its staff world leading authorities in the fields of area and regional studies, conflict analysis, security studies, international relations theory and international ethics. 

The MA in International Relations is one of the largest graduate programmes in the School of Politics and International Relations, and each year attracts a diverse student body from around the world.

Fees

Fees for this and other Kent Postgraduate Politics programmes can be found on the Student Finance page.

Why study International Relations at Kent?

Duration

1 year full-time, 2 years part-time (90 ECTS credits) or 2 years full-time (120 ECTS credits).

Knowledge and understanding

You will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • historical and theoretical issues at the forefront of the discipline of international relations, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources
  • the epistemological and methodological principles in their application to the study of international relations
  • key ontological, theoretical, and methodological problems of international relations
  • current challenges to international order, co-operation, identity, social formations, and global issues, and possible strategies to address them
  • the changing role of the state in the context of globalisation and regional integration and the implications for international peace and security
  • how to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions, deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly.

Intellectual Skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • general research skills, especially bibliographic and computing skills
  • gathering, organising and deploying arguments about human rights and international relations from a variety of secondary and some primary sources
  • identifying, investigating, analysing, formulating and advocating solutions to problems
  • developing reasoned arguments, synthesising relevant information and exercising critical judgement
  • reflecting on, and managing, your own learning and seeking to make use of constructive feedback from your peers and staff to enhance your performance and personal skills
  • managing your own learning self-critically
  • the ability to perform effectively in another academic environment and a different linguistic and cultural setting.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • applying concepts, theories and methods used in the study of international relations, the analysis of political events, ideas, institutions and practices
  • evaluating different interpretations of political issues and events
  • describing, evaluating and applying different approaches to collecting, analysing and presenting political information
  • developing a good understanding of the main epistemological issues relative to research in the social sciences, including some major theoretical and epistemological debates in the social sciences, such as explanation of, and understanding the differences between, positivist, realist and other accounts of social science and the practical implications of the major alternative philosophical positions in the social sciences for research.

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: the ability to communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT), organise information clearly and coherently, use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information
  • information technology: produce written documents, undertake online research, communicate using email, process information using databases;
  • working with others: define and review the work of others, work co-operatively on group tasks, understand how groups function, collaborate with others and contribute effectively to the achievement of common goals
  • improving your own learning: explore your strengths and weaknesses, time-management skills, review your working environment (especially the student-staff relationship), develop autonomy in learning, work independently, demonstrate initiative and self-organisation
  • important research management skills include the setting of appropriate timescales for different stages of the research, with clear starting and finishing dates (through a dissertation), presentation of a clear statement of the purposes and expected results of the research, and developing appropriate means of estimating and monitoring resources and use of time
  • problem-solving: identify and define problems, explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them.

This programme aims to:

  • provide a programme that will attract, and meet the needs of, those seeking advanced training in the discipline of international relations
  • provide you with a research-active learning environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of international relations, including its political, social, and economic aspects
  • examine how state, non-state and supra-national actors behave and interact through a dynamic appreciation of different levels of analysis
  • ensure that you acquire advanced knowledge of the theories of international relations, the heritage and development of the discipline, its major debates, its inherent nature as an interdisciplinary study, and a critical appreciation of the essentially contested nature of politics in general and international relations in particular
  • ensure that you acquire an advanced understanding of the relationship between the theoretical, methodological, and empirical content of the issue-areas studied
  • develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills), in particular through a substantial dissertation.
MA Award
Full-time Study Mode
12 months Duration

Entry Requirements For This Course

A first or upper-second class honours degree in a relevant subject or equivalent.

Please also see our general entry requirements at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgrad/apply/entry.html

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